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Sunday, April 17, 2016

An Easy-to-Build Oar Cruiser

In an earlier post on “…Foot Braces”, I mentioned a boat that Paul Truszkowski built, pictured below. The boat is double ended, flat bottom and about 15’ (4.6m) long. She is 28" (71cm) wide, with vertical sides.

Paul Truszkowski’s “Beaux Eaux”

I had an opportunity to row this boat on a windless day. I was surprised that I could row it (very briefly) at 5.4 mph (8.7 kph), which is ‘hull speed’ for this length of boat. The boat is almost identical (bottom half) to Michael Storer’s Quick Canoe pictured below.

Michael Storer’s Quick Canoe. Picture courtesy Rick Landreville
Oar Cruiser Conversion (compare to original Quick Canoe above)

I thought that this would make an easy-to-build and effective Oar Cruiser… with some modifications.

Using the plans for Quick Canoe, available at Duckworks I built an 8:1 model, pictured below.

Oar Cruiser Conversion of Michael Storer’s Quick Canoe

The conversion to an oar cruiser included the following:

  • Added two full bulkheads approximately 4’ (1.2m) in from both stems. This created a 7’ (2.1 m) center cockpit, suitable for carrying a passenger and for one person sleeping.
  • Dropped the top of both stems about 7” (178 mm) so that the decks would be 15” (381 mm, chine to gunnel) at the new bulkheads down to 12” (305mm, chine to bottom of skeg) at the stems. Note that everything below the top of the stems is exactly like Michael designed, including the double skegs and full length keel.
  • Installed two decks from bulkheads to stems.
  • Lowered the gunnels, between the two bulkheads, about 2” (51 mm).
  • Added a (red) rubrail.
  • Added two splash guards at the inner end of both decks… the forward one curved and sloping forward.
  • Added a full length (of cockpit) floorboard to accommodate an adjustable rowing seat and foot rest.
  • Added an inner gunnel strip to enable hooking the adjustable oar lock supports to the sides of the hull, providing a 4’ (1.2 m) span for the oars.


The width of the boat is 27” (686 mm) to the outside of the gunnels, and 22” (559 mm) at the chines.

Interior Shows Raised Tent Support Hoops


Comparison to Lars Boat Conversion (shown in earlier post)

This will be a fast oar cruiser... And very tender.

What do you think?

The next post will be about model building – tools/materials used and why do it.

5 comments:

  1. This post makes such a message: the essence of the oar cruising are oars not hulls. Nice job. Thanks, Tom and Paul.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Hi Wojtek... To use a 'car' analogy, the oars (and oar locks, seat and the relationship among them) are the 'drive train', the boat is the body and frame, and we are the engine...
    The surprising thing for me was how effortless (relatively) it was to row the flat bottom hull, essentially a 'sharpie' hull. I think the key to easily driven hulls is a high waterline length to waterline width ratio, at least 6:1 AND light weight AND low windage, especially at the ends... Now add sleeping capability and we have an oar cruiser... All the other stuff is just refinement... OMHO

    ReplyDelete
  3. If you search for sawfish kayak, you will find my kayak design, built out of foam. 12 feet long, 28 inches wide, 23 pounds.
    I created it for my parents as they cannot handle the weight of their plastic kayaks anymore.
    I'm a rower at heart and am designing a pulling boat in foam in my head.
    I plan on construction this winter.
    I'm torn between a guide boat, and an easier to build shape.
    I'm not so much into overnight trips, but love your blog.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. When I read your article on the sawfish kayak, it got me to thinking of using your Skin On Foam (SOF) technique for an oar cruiser... light, unsinkable, custom designed any way you want, warm in the winter for on-board sleeping, inexpensive (relatively)... Hmmmm.
      Tom

      Delete
  4. If you search for sawfish kayak, you will find my kayak design, built out of foam. 12 feet long, 28 inches wide, 23 pounds.
    I created it for my parents as they cannot handle the weight of their plastic kayaks anymore.
    I'm a rower at heart and am designing a pulling boat in foam in my head.
    I plan on construction this winter.
    I'm torn between a guide boat, and an easier to build shape.
    I'm not so much into overnight trips, but love your blog.

    ReplyDelete