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Sunday, April 23, 2017

Richard Woods Bee: An Oar Cruiser

Richard Wood's Bee is one of two similar 'oar cruisers'... the other is Linnet.

Peter Kovacsy's Bee

Plans Overview of Bee

Specifications


  • Length: 16’ (4.86m)
  • Beam: 4’ 3” (1.3m)
  • Weight: 108 pounds (49Kgs)
  • Carrying capacity:  4 Adults
  • Optional sail: 38 sq ft (3.5sqm)

Plans  available from:

Richard Woods
Duckworks
Fyne Boat Kits

Richard’s Commentary:

“BEE has a Vee bow which allows her to slice through a choppy sea. The moderate freeboard midships with reduced windage fore and aft plus the built in dagger-board case mean that sensible owners can take her out in coastal waters, in addition to all inland waterways.
BEE can also be fitted with a simple low rig for offwind sailing or when the crew is feeling lazy. Because of its light weight and easily driven hull, BEE will surprise with her speed. BEE can easily be rowed for long periods by one, or even by two… there's room for passengers and lots of gear. She is stable, so you don't need to be an expert to handle her.
Because of her light weight BEE can easily be cartopped, opening up many more cruising grounds. BEE is very easy to build using just 3 sheets of 4mm (3/16") and 3 sheets of 6mm (1/4") plywood, plus some timber and epoxy.”
Bee Car-topped

Peter Kovacsy site is a photo essay of his building Bee… His photography is beautiful, as well as his workmanship on Bee... as attested to by the following two photos...

Transom of Peter Kovacsy's Bee

Peter used Gaco locks on his Bee

This is an oar cruiser that is sea worthy, stable and able to carry a full set of equipment and supplies for cruising.

14 comments:

  1. It looks slippery enough. I just don't understand the purpose of the reverse transom. It seems to aggravate hanging the rudder. The rest of the design makes a great deal of sense to me.

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    1. Hi Bob... Reading through Richard's materials, he said that the reverse transom prevented people from using an outboard... I'm not sure if that was his rationale for it... Another possibility is that it MAY enable a better fit of the panels on the sheets of plywood? Or he thought it just looked cool... I kinda like the look... Tom

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  2. Interesting boat-particularly the stability when swamped...yet another project to consider !!

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    Replies
    1. I know the feeling... so many boats and so little space and time.
      Tom

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  3. Your Post is very useful, I am truly to this blog which is specially design about the Cruise Tips.
    Great job.


    Cruise Tips

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. James, thank you for your kind words... But the 'cruising' in this blog has nothing to do with the 'cruising' in your link to "Cruise Tips".
      Tom

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  4. So Shinny and slipery, that's how it looks in pic, hope that's not the case with original. Overall it looks really good, thank you for sharing it with us

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  5. Yes... Peter does beautiful work.

    Tom

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  6. Awesome Article..!!
    I never seen this type of article..really super and very useful information.
    Thanks a lot.
    Sea Jay Boats Shepparton Echuca

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks... Glad you found it useful.

      Tom

      Delete
  7. Interesting and valuable information which have share here well done.



    galapagos tours tips

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Alston... I'd be interested in how you have shared this information with "Galapagos Tour Tips"... what's the connection?
      Tom

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  8. this is such an amazing blog I really liked the blog.Thanks for it.

    way to travel to Galapagos

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi James... thank you for the "...amazing...". I don't think anyone has used that term for the blog... Have a great day!
      Tom

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